About Writing on Wednesdays: What’s Up?

Well, I’ve been writing of course.

You might be surprised to know I have blogs written but not posted. Most are 3/4 written or just need to be polished up but I’ve yet to do this. I may never post them and just start over.

The problem is allergies are killing me this year. Not literally of course but there’s been a couple of days all I could do was just boil some water with sage in it and ride out the runny nose, coughing, sneezing in the bed with a box of tissues.  The worst part is when my eyes swell, itch and water making it difficult to see let alone type.

I bought one of those sinus cleaners and I came to the conclusion all that controversy about water boarding may be exaggerated. Cause hel-lo, Americans pay good money to waterboard themselves when they purchase one of these products. I thought I was going to drown myself the first time I tried it last night.

Huh? Oh, yeah. Right. Writing.

More

Advertisements

About Writing On Wednesdays: What New Writers Want to Know

This Stellarcon panel about new writers consisted of Ed Schubert, Laurel Ann Hill and Tony Ruggiero.

There are no two ways about it; Laurel Ann Hill is an eccentric lady. At various panels she showed up with a big, fuzzy Russian hat on her head and at others she had dolls. The Russian hat I understood because that one room had temperatures colder than Siberia.

The various dolls weren’t props for her books. Maybe they were a type of security blanket? She wasn’t a big talker during the panels but she did enliven the room with just her presence.

The panel didn’t discuss the obvious like butt in seat, pen to paper. Instead they offered other tidbits for us to consider such as ways to look differently at our writing. 

One panelist, Ed Schubert, suggested putting your work away for a week or two. If possible for as long as a month or two. When you go back to it, it’s fresh.

Another way to keep your work fresh is to read your work out loud. This method allows you to view the story from another perspective. It also alerts you when a sentence is awkwardly phrased.

The panel agreed if you’re a serious writer then you must go to workshops. I’m not going to lie; it’s scary. The first one I ever went to was at Stellarcon. Intimidated to say the least, I was so out of my league it wasn’t funny.

The panel was comprised of professional editors, authors and publishers ready to critique the 100 words or so that we’d just wrote. Scary stuff but our privacy was taken very seriously, at least in the workshop I was in.

It was worth the mild panic attack when I had to read what I had just written off the top of my head because I walked away with a wealth of knowledge and a surprising bit of confidence.

Save your dollars because there’s only one problem with some workshops and that’s the expense. Well known writers charge out the rear for a workshop. We are talking at least $700 and higher for two or three days.

I don’t know about you but I can’t afford that right now. Some of them do offer videos that are cheaper and the cheapest of all would be the workshops offered at various cons. They are included with the cost of the con so you might want to check out what cons are held in your surrounding areas and see if they offer a workshop. 

More

Curio’s Past, Shhh.