About Writing On Wednesdays: Tolkien Rules

Here are some quotes from J.R.R. Tolkien to ponder. He is the one who inspired me to write fantasy, you know.

“Still round the corner there may wait/A new road or a secret gate. And though I oft have passed them by/A day will come at last when I/Shall take the hidden paths that run/West of the moon, East of the Sun.” J. R. R. Tolkien

“A single dream is more powerful than a thousand realities.” J. R. R. Tolkien

 “I am told that I talk in shorthand and then smudge it.” J. R. R. Tolkien

 “I have claimed that Escape is one of the main functions of fairy-stories, and since I do not disapprove of them, it is plain that I do not accept the tone of scorn or pity with which ‘Escape’ is now so often used. Why should a man be scorned if, finding himself in prison, he tries to get out and go home? Or if he cannot do so, he thinks and talks about other topics than jailers and prison-walls?”  J. R. R. Tolkien

“Never laugh at live dragons.” J. R. R. Tolkien

“It’s the job that’s never started takes longest to finish.” From the Lord of the Rings. by J. R. R. Tolkien

“Not all who wander are lost.” J. R. R. Tolkien

“Courage is found in unlikely places.” J. R. R. Tolkien

“Fairy tale does not deny the existence of sorrow and failure: the possibility of these is necessary to the joy of deliverance. It denies (in the face of much evidence, if you will) universal final defeat…giving a fleeting glimpse of Joy; Joy beyond the walls of the world, poignant as grief.” J. R. R. Tolkien

“I warn you, if you bore me, I shall take my revenge.” J. R. R. Tolkien

“It does not do to leave a live dragon out of your calculations, if you live near him.” From the Hobbit.  J. R. R. Tolkien

“Little by little, one travels far.” J. R. R. Tolkien

“Fantasy is escapist, and that is its glory. If a soldier is imprisioned by the enemy, don’t we consider it his duty to escape?. . .If we value the freedom of mind and soul, if we’re partisans of liberty, then it’s our plain duty to escape, and to take as many people with us as we can!” J. R. R. Tolkien

Peace.

Who inspired or inspires you to write? Do you enjoy quotes? What’s your favorite?

Advertisements

Freaky On Fridays: The Itsy Bitsy Spider

Isn’t so bitsy. 

In general I try to ignore spiders. The occasional spider does come in and I, Paul or Tracey will catch them and put them back outside.

They don’t make me happy and when I really think about them and the way they kill and eat their prey, it kind of freaks me out. However, I recognize they are good for the environment and if they leave me alone; I leave them alone.

We’ve even had the occasional pet spiders. Years ago some black widows set up webs in my book shed so Paul caught them in a small pet habitat. Tracey fed them and kept them under the porch for a while before I made her set them free. Out in woods. Far, far away.

Last week I let the dogs out on the back porch. They stopped long enough to greet Shades, one of our indoor/outdoor kitties, and then ran on out into the backyard.  

As I closed the sliding the doors I saw a humongous spider running at me along its web. While I was sick a Carolina Wolf spider set up shop there beside my doors. Yikes!

More

About Writing on Wednesdays: What’s Your Point of View?

Ok. There is a lot more to point of view (pov) than I realized and it took the pros at Stellarcon to point it out to me.  Ed Schubert, Laurell Ann Hill, David Coe and Gray Rinehart were the panelists for this discussion at Stellarcon.

David Coe spearheaded this panel and was able to point out the ways a writer can manipulate their story with different points of view. This was a very interesting and informative discussion.

As every writer should know the point of view is the eyes, ears, thoughts and emotions through which the reader sees the action of the story at any one given time in the story.

First person is what I call the “I” books. The story is told from one pov in the character’s voice. There was some discussion as to whether this is more intimate and conveys stronger emotion. I think it is and does.

In the book All Is Quiet on the Western Front the story is told through the narrator’s eyes and because it is I think the end is devastating in a way it would not have been otherwise.

David Coe gave his opinion that first person doesn’t work well in epic fantasy although it can be done.

Second person. ‘You’. It is rarely done and everyone agreed they did not like it. Yeah, I’m not sure how it could be done without sounding accusatory. The panelists did not have any examples of that. Does anyone else?

Third person. Personal pronouns such as ‘he’ or ‘she’ are used. Everyone agreed this pov adds tension to the story. It is the most used pov and the most popular.

Omniscient. Tells the story from the distance. There was general agreement that this pov is hard to do in today’s market. Readers want the writing to be up close and personal.

More

Curio’s Past, Shhh.